Expert Opinion

Determining Which Patients are Optimal for Ablation, Cardioversion, Oral & Anticoagulant Treatments

Oussama Wazni, MD, section head of clinical cardiac electrophysiology at Cleveland Clinic, discusses which treatments are best for patients who exhibit symptoms of atrial fibrillation.

Cleveland Clinic: The New Patient Experience with Cancer

Nathan Pennell, MD, is a leading authority on the treatment of patients with lung cancer. He and colleagues at Cleveland Clinic are leading the development of new treatment approaches and new strategies to improve patient experience. 

Ablation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

According to the American College of Cardiology, ablation is the first-line treatment for atrial fibrillation. Dr. Oussama Wazni weighs the pros and cons of this treatment option.

American College of Cardiology Issues New Atrial Fibrillation Treatment Guidelines

  • Use the CHA2DS2-VASc score for determining which patients are at greatest risk of stroke.
  • Clinicians should take an individualized approach to antithrombotic therapy.
  • Strict rate control is preferred over lenient.
  • Catheter ablation is a first-line option.

Treatment Choices in Atrial Fibrillation

Managing atrial fibrillation to prevent stroke: Use nothing or an oral anticoagulant. Use the CHA2DS2-VASc algorithm as well as gender to determine treatment choices. Dr. Wazni presents treatment choices in further detail.

Managing Atrial Fibrillation and Preventing Stroke

Patients with atrial fibrillation are seen with increasing frequency by clinicians. Can it be cured? How must it be managed? How can clinicians prevent stroke in patients with a-fib? Dr. Wazni addresses these questions in our latest video.

This Procedure Is Now First-Line A-Fib Therapy: New ACC Guidelines

  • Recent guidelines from the American college of Cardiology offer important revisions regarding the management of atrial fibrillation.
  • Ablation is now a first-line therapy.
  • Cardiologists should now use the more precise risk stratification scoring system.
  • Tight heart rate control is preferred over lenient control.
  • Antithrombotic therapy is to be individualized based on shared decision-making between patient and physician.

Weight Loss, The CABANA Trial, and the Future of Atrial Fibrillation

In this video, Dr. Oussama Wazni addresses the implications of weight loss, bariatric surgery, and the ongoing CABANA trial on the future of treatment of refractory atrial fibrillation.

Weight Loss, The CABANA Trial, and the Future of Atrial Fibrillation

In this video, Dr. Oussama Wazni addresses the implications of weight loss, bariatric surgery, and the ongoing CABANA trial on the future of treatment of refractory atrial fibrillation.

Pediatric Academy Says No More Codeine for Kids

  • American Society of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians stop prescribing the drug.
  • Codeine response is widely variable among children, outcomes are unpredictable.
  • This crude opioid is potentially lethal.
  • Other drugs are better suited for pediatric clinical scenarios.

Your Money: The Three Types of Risk

Michael S. Berry, ChFC, is an advisor to MDalert.com. He helps us serve the financial planning concerns of our physician readers. He is also an independent financial consultant with a proven process. His unique wealth planning process engages a team of experts in a variety of disciplines in order to deliver comprehensive results.

In this short clip, Mr. Berry discusses ways to mitigate the three types of financial risk.

It’s a Ruff Day … or, Should We Treat Our Customers Like Dogs?

It is essential for individuals to focus on improving their own work environment so that they can better serve their customers. If your employees aren’t happy, your patients, guests, and physicians will not be happy.

Digital Marketing in Today’s Healthcare. Or Am I Rearranging the Deck Chairs on the Titanic, Again?

Marketing has always been a conundrum for healthcare executives. Do I really need to market? Do consumers make their decisions based on an ad? Doctors really drive healthcare decisions so why waste resources on marketing?

Seven Steps to Effective Crisis Management

If you have worked in healthcare for more than a few years, you have probably seen at least one crisis develop in your facility. Although every incident can become a crisis, there are some that happen that can have lasting effects for the facility and everyone it touches.

Preparing Staff for Initiation of Major Site Construction Projects

The excitement of opening a new unit or a department expansion is palpable. Not only is the staff excited about working in new construction and quite often utilizing new equipment, but also the statement that a new unit says to the hospital staff and community. The support of the physicians, staff, and community have allowed for the expansion/renovation of the hospital.


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